Thursday, 23 March 2017

Could Papa, Actually Get The Moon?

At the weekend, I watched an animation of 'Papa, Please Get The Moon For Me' for the first time. As I watched it with my own children at home, it struck a chord with me as my class are currently studying a unit in science about the Earth, Sun, Moon and our Solar System. So, today, I played the animation for my class. After I'd played it, I played it a second time and asked the children to write down anything in the video they thought was fictional rather than scientific fact.



Made with Padlet

In future years, I might use this task as a pre and post assessment. What do they think is fictional before some teaching and then afterwards. Nice story, nice animation and some good science learning...

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Slow / Fast Motion Video Task

Again some inspiration from the TV series Taskmaster. We've had success in the past with the 'Backwards Video Task'. In the most recent series, the contestants were asked to film something that when sped up or slowed down made it more interesting or amusing.


Again like before, use it as a group work and/or ICT task. Both iMovie and Movie Maker allow speeding up or slowing down a clip and apps can be purchased to do the same too.

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Twitter for Parts of Speech

Find a Tweet or two (with no swearing or major punctuation/grammar errors*) and ask the children to identify the parts of speech contained in it. They'll be short texts as they've got to be within 140 characters.

  In this example, I found a Tweet with the word 'stamp' in it:
Here's another...

* It's a challenge!  

You could even write your own, or get the children to

Friday, 17 March 2017

The Story of the Rugby Match

In rugby (union and league), points are earned in various different ways during a game. 

Here's the scoring system in rugby union:
- try, 5 points (and then the opportunity to kick a conversion for 2 points);
- penalty, 3 points;
- drop goal, 3 points (not frequent).

So, looking at a scoreline from a game, can pupils work out how the teams achieved the scores they have? These could be mid-game (like the ones below), full time or even fictional.






Are all scorelines possible? Can any scores only be gained in one way?

Friday, 3 March 2017

The Shoe Shop is Open

Here's an idea to help with those practical lessons. Particularly art, DT and so on...
 

You know, sewing where half the class want their needle rethreading, DT where everyone needs to use the glue gun and similar occurrences.

It uses the system I first came across as a child in Clarks. You go in the shop, take a ticket with a number on and then wait. In an orderly fashion, those with tickets are seen. The shop assistant decides when they next see someone.

In the classroom, put up five Post-It Notes with the numbers 1-5 on them. If someone needs help from the teacher, they take a number and see what else they can get on with. In order, the teacher calls out which number they will see next (in a "Cashier number 4 please" voice of course!). When the child has been seen, they put their number back for someone else to use. If there are more than one adult in the room, each adult has their own coloured Post-It.

It works quite well. Give it a go.

Wednesday, 8 February 2017

The Weather Tree

Another post that is in response to a Tweet we received.



So, here's something we did a fair few years ago...



To start with, the tree is empty and each day a leaf is added. The colour of the leaf is dependant on the temperature outside. On the leaf, other observations and readings about the weather can be added. 


What is creates is a very visual display of the temperature changes across the year. On closer inspection, further information about the day's weather can also be seen.


The leaves were kept in coloured pouches at the bottom that had the key written on them to explain what the colours referred to.

Monday, 30 January 2017

Some Quite Interesting Numbers

Watching last week's QI on the BBC, they had a feature that I thought would be useful in school to ignite some interest in maths. 

What's interesting about these numbers?


The picture is the Mayan zero.

The '2 to the power of...' is the largest known prime number (at the time of writing).

If someone wrote out the numbers 1 - 10 billion in words and organised them in alphabetical order, 8,000,000,085 would be the first odd number.

142,857 is a cyclical number: multiply it by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 and the product (each time) is an anagram of it!

Frobenius number - Chicken nuggets are sold in 6s, 9s and 20s. 43 is the largest number of nuggets that can't be bought.   

There you go. Share them as they are, or even make an investigation out of some of them. Quite interesting.